Tag Archive: Mars

HI-SEAS 2 patch resting on volcanic rock near the crew habitat (Photo credit: HI-SEAS/Ross Lockwood)

This past week we celebrated the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. And in 16 years, according to NASA’s latest projections, humans will be stepping foot on another celestial body — Mars!

Meanwhile, today marked the completion of the second Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) mission. HI-SEAS, run by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and led by Principal Investigator Dr. Kim Binstead is funded by the NASA Human Research Program and consists of four missions, ranging from four months to one year in duration. These missions are being used by researchers to determine the challenges that will face those who take our first steps on the long journey to Mars. Primarily focused on the psychological issues that will face crews on long duration, close confines space missions, there are also opportunistic research studies. From advanced clothing that is bacteria and odor-resistant, to cooking and food preparation using both freeze-dried and shelf-stable ingredients, to the use and capabilities of 3D printers, HI-SEAS strives to provide a high fidelity analog environment to study the challenges that will face humans as we venture further into the universe.

It has been my privilege and pleasure to volunteer for the HI-SEAS program since the first mission as a member of the mission support team, specifically what is referred to as First Tier Support (FTS). As someone who is neither a scientist nor (currently) an engineer, I know I certainly won’t be on any space mission going anywhere – Mars, the Moon, or even Low Earth Orbit, any time soon. Let’s forget the fact that I’m 6’ 5” tall and won’t fit into any spacecraft currently available. However, working in a mission support role for HI-SEAS, along with the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), I hope that in some small way I am helping pave the way for the future explorers that will make their way to Mars and beyond. There have been challenges faced in both missions, as I’m sure there will be in the coming missions, yet the lessons learned will surely help researchers and scientists create new methods and procedures to make future analog simulations, and even more important, real world missions, even better.

Welcome home Casey, Ross, Lucie, Tiffany, and Anne! Let’s keep exploring!